TRUMP VS CLINTON - 2ND AMENDMENT

  
TRUMP VS. CLINTON – 2ND AMENDMENT

As a disclaimer, I am an ardent supporter of the Constitution as it is written and all of the amendments including the 2nd Amendment. However, I am giving my best to provide the least biased current information based on my research. The below generally represents each presidential candidate’s current view on the right to bear arms.

Also, each candidate has changed their views over time and may further change their views in the next few months and years. I am sure that more specific information will surface when the next president is chosen.

TRUMP – Donald Trump is currently a strong supporter of the 2nd Amendment. He has an A- rating from the National Rifle Association (NRA).

He recently said that "The politicians are chipping away at it, day-by-day, night-by-night. It gets weaker and weaker, We're not going to let it happen. We're going to protect our 2nd amendment."

Generally, here is where Trump says he stands on the protection of this civil right:
• Against banning types of guns or magazine sizes;
• Against expanding background checks, instead focus on fixing the "broken" system. (It’s unclear what he believes is broken and the cause);
• Advocates expanding state gun permits to include the whole country rather than state by state restrictions; and
• A federal law that would allow qualified citizens to carry concealed weapons.

Clinton says that she doesn't want to do away with the 2nd Amendment, but is fighting for stricter gun control laws.
She recently said, "We need to close the loopholes and support universal background checks. How many people have to die before we actually act?"

Clinton has an F rating from the NRA. She is also working with “Mothers of the Movement” in her campaign.

Generally, here is where Clinton says that she stands on gun control:
• Expand background checks;
• Repeal the law that protects gun manufacturers from being held liable for crimes committed with their products;
• Provide funding to increase inspections on licensed arms dealers;
• Prohibit domestic abuse criminals from purchasing guns (There is already a 1968 federal law that prohibits people convicted of family violence offenses, even misdemeanors, from possessing firearms);
• Make it illegal for a person with a clean record to purchase a gun for a convicted criminal (This is also already the law in Georgia and in most, if not all other states); and
• Restrict military-grade weapons.

Actually, the two agree to a certain extent on one issue; mental illness. Both candidates advocate further treatment for people currently suffering from mental illness. They also agree that people with mental illness, who are also currently dangerous, should not possess firearms.

But, there are important questions here. What conditions will be considered mental illness? What happens when someone recovers and is stabilized? Will these measures discourage a moderately depressed person from seeking treatment?

This is an unusual election in a turbulent time in America. The candidates are very different and have polarized views on almost everything. But, one thing is crystal clear. If the issues surrounding the 2nd Amendment are important to you, your choice in November should be clear.